Powering Potential

Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) makes it possible for children who are deaf or hard of hearing to learn to listen and talk, which powers language, literacy, and lifetime success.

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Listening & Spoken Language (LSL)

Learning listening and spoken language (LSL) is possible for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Discover what the LSL approach is, why it matters, and what it takes to teach your child how to listen and talk.

Parents Mike and Julie reflect on their journey teaching their daughter to listen and talk.

HEARING TESTING & DEVICES

It’s important for you to know the hearing status of your baby. If they have hearing loss, there are medical and technological ways to get auditory information through the doorway to your baby’s brain.

Dr. Carol Flexer, a notable audiology thought leader, explains how we hear with our brains and why hearing technology is so important.

LSL Services & Support

After receiving a hearing loss diagnosis and fitting your child with hearing technology, you should continue your listening and spoken language (LSL) journey by seeking early LSL intervention services and building a team of professionals, friends, and family to support you along the way.

Lillian Henderson, Certified LSLS®, shares her perspective on the parent-professional partnership in LSL intervention.

Learning & Growing LSL

The goal of the LSL approach is for your child with hearing loss to develop listening and spoken language skills just like their hearing friends. Discover some of the strategies you can use, how to include LSL techniques in your daily routines, and how to prepare for new life experiences as your child grows.

Meet children with hearing loss speaking for themselves about their hearing devices, their school, and what they love to do!

Listening & Reading Connection

There’s a direct connection between the development of listening and spoken language (LSL) and literacy skills, like reading and writing. By incorporating the listening and reading connection into your baby’s daily life, you can grow their brain for a lifetime of reading and unlimited possibilities.  

Hunter is in second grade with hearing friends. Watch as she participates in reading with her classmates.

Celebrate LSL

Hearing is the foundational building block for children to learn to listen and talk, become healthy readers, and do well in school. Hearing powers language, literacy, dreams, opportunities, and lifetime success. Hearing powers a child’s potential.

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Mike and Julie talk about their early experience making the decision to pursue LSL for Maesy. Listen as they share how their LSL interventionist helped them set and exceed high expectations for her.

Riley’s mom shares her initial fears as her daughter started mainstream school. Listen as she talks about overcoming those fears through asking questions and finding the right place with supportive teachers for her daughter’s successful transition to school with hearing friends.

Celebrate Outcomes: An Inside Look

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READ MORE ABOUT HEARING FIRST

At Hearing First, we want all children to benefit from the availability of newborn hearing screening and for parents to learn the status of their baby’s hearing first. Hearing is a foundational building block for children to learn to listen and talk, become healthy readers, and do well in school.

Today, children who are deaf or hard of hearing can learn to listen and talk and can achieve learning and literacy outcomes on par with their hearing friends. The earlier a child with hearing loss is identified, amplified, and receiving help, the more opportunities that child will have. We want all children to have the opportunity to take advantage of access to sound – a critical building block for future success. We are dedicated to powering potential.